Jacob van Oostsanen

Jacob van Oostsanen - Large Format Fine Art Prints and Reproductions

Jacob Cornelisz van Oostsanen (c. 1465-1533) was a Dutch painter. He was a celebrated artist in the 16th century. His studio on the Kalverstraat, then already a fashionable street, developed into a highly productive workshop, taking commissions from patrons in Holland and beyond. He painted portraits and religious compositions, as well as combinations of the two, in print or oils.

Van Oostsanen is one of the great masters from the Northern Netherlands who laid the foundation for the flourishing success of Dutch art that followed. His works show how art developed during his lifetime from the late medieval period to the early Renaissance.

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Jacob van Oostsanen

Salome with the Head of John the Baptist

€37.00
Salome danced seductively for King Herod, and, as a reward, she was granted a wish. Urged on by her mother Herodias, Salome asked for the head of John the Baptist, who had criticized Herodias’ adultery with the king. Salome is showing us her prize, the saint’s head on a platter. 1524, Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam
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Jacob van Oostsanen

Saul and the Witch of Endor

€37.00
Fearing the outcome of a battle, Saul, king of the Israelites, consulted the fortune-telling witch of Endor. On hearing that he would lose, the king threw himself on his sword. His suicide – in the middle background – is a warning against witchcraft. In the foreground is a Witches’ Sabbath: the fortune-teller sits within a chalk circle, surrounded by...
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Jacob van Oostsanen

The Adoration of the Magi

€37.00
Here, the adoration of the Magi is not taking place in the customary dilapidated stable but in a more architectural setting. The building bears no resemblance to the ruins of King David’s palace, where artists often situated the event, but appears to be a composite of contemporary buildings. In addition to the usual figures of the Christ Child, the Virgin...
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Jacob van Oostsanen

The Crucifixion

€37.00
For his depiction of Golgotha, the mountain on which Christ was crucified, the artist chose a high viewpoint. In doing so, he created a vast landscape in which to represent successive episodes of the Passion of Christ simultaneously. This narrative convention was often used in medieval painting. c. 1507-1510, Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam
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